Category

Politicking (/ˈpɑlətɪkɪn/)
Young students all over Mississippi and the South are celebrating their high school graduation under the shadow of COVID-19. Schools have taken to breaking up graduation ceremonies into multi-day events in order to keep participation low and reduce the risk of spreading the deadly disease. Clinton High School, for example, broke their celebration into 19...
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It doesn’t take any real level of scholarship to understand Mississippi has struggled with equity since it was granted statehood more than two centuries ago. That trend has continued with the state’s latest—and honestly feeble—attempt to address the disproportionate economic and social toll the COVID-19 pandemic is exacting on Black Mississippians, who represent nearly 40...
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Pregnancy and childbirth are as old as time but pregnancy and childbirth under the cloud of COVID-19 is not reliably recorded anywhere in human history. Until we find proof of an earlier outbreak of this particular strain of coronavirus in our species’ medical record, we can safely say this is an unenviable first.  We can...
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The U.S. Department of Education, under Education Secretary Betsy Devos, is rolling back Obama-era rules to the nationwide Title IX program that will make it even harder for women to report incidents of rape and sexual assault to campus supervisors. “Title IX” is a federal civil rights law passed as a component of several amendments in...
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Two years after barely defeating his Black Democratic opponent, Georgia Gov. Brian Kemp is opening his state for business amid a deadly pandemic. Atlanta residents, frankly, are not amused. “I can’t understand where this (eagerness) is coming from considering we’re unable to properly distance ourselves from our clients,” said Linda Sharp, owner of Lark &...
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While everybody was fretting over being locked away in their own house for a few more weeks, one Mississippi man is facing being locked away in state prison for 12 years for walking into a county pen with a cellphone. Mississippi resident Willie Nash didn’t know what hit him the day Circuit Court Judge Mark...
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When the Mississippi economy faltered due to the 2008 national recession, and again in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina in 2005, it was largely due to circumstances beyond the influence of the average Mississippian. When Americans and Mississippians voluntarily choose to shut down a whole economy, however, we do it with flair. Mississippi and the...
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A three-judge panel of the Fifth Circuit Court of Appeals did something nobody expected in this political climate: They took public education seriously. Last month, the judges bucked their court’s conservative nature and opened the door to a trial over school funding, which conservative U.S. District Judge William H. Barbour had wanted dead. Two years...
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The coronavirus strain that has swept the nation threatens health, economic and mental breaking points, but it has taken a particularly hard toll on the powerless. The working-poor typically have no babysitters when schools close and their income tends to evaporate with their hourly-wage work schedule when managers shut things down until further notice.  The...
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Try to imagine being born to an indigenous[1] family in Guatemala. Your community has faced persecution and violence for years just for being alive. You desperately look for a safe place to raise your family and you think you’ve found a place you can call home—Mississippi. You legally cross the border seeking asylum. You find...
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