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In Her Words
for a Spanish translation of this story, see below A few months ago, the whole world practically stopped due to the COVID-19 pandemic. While this pandemic has caused an economic slowdown and generated negative effects all around the world—GDP fall, massive layoffs, rising unemployment rate, drop in consumption, public health crisis, and so on—people have...
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According to the Washington Post, which began tracking police shootings in 2015, the cops have killed more than 5,600 people nationwide. Of those, 24 percent were Black Americans (about 1,300) and 247 were women.  Forty-eight of those were Black women. This may sound small, but consider what Marissa Iati, Jennifer Jenkins and Sommer Brugal write...
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It seemed irresponsible not to say anything on our next staff call, but I didn’t know what to say, so I’d been vacillating. Then our senior staff reporter sent a text and asked if we—he wouldn’t write it, he noted—should have an editorial response to the most recent murders of Black folks. Here again, we probably should...
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I am coming to accept that the Hot Girl Summer I was looking forward to might become an extended season of self-isolation, or maybe some parody of The Purge where people fight over packages of toilet paper, while neglecting the soap and disinfectant aisles altogether (as if that isn’t part of the reason we’re in...
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Note: In recognition of Women’s History Month, I started out writing an admiration piece about Lizzo. During this time, the novel coronavirus arrived in the US and spurred many discussions about how individuals living in “fat” and large bodies as a pre-existing condition are being treated in this crisis. Thus, with those discussion in the...
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“Lo siento, pero su hija no puede practicar ballet porque tiene el pie plano.”   “I’m sorry, but your daughter cannot practice ballet because she has flat feet.”  The teacher and all of her ballet students in the class were white. Yamay “La Fina” Mejías Hernández and her mother were the only Black people in the...
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I imagine when the Geto Boys penned the lyrics to “Damn it Feels Good to Be a Gangsta,” they weren’t thinking about women being the gangsters. But they should have been. Not the Scarface, Godfather or Bonnie and Clyde kind of gangsters; rather, the cradling the universe while birthing civilizations and fighting for equality at...
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During the summer of 2008, I visited Mississippi for the first time. It was my first time being away from home and also my first time staying on a historically black college campus. I was 15 years old when I heard about women in the civil rights movement, outside of Rosa Parks. Black women such as...
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Dear Natalie,   As we celebrate, organizationally, the Black women who inspire us to be our best selves, I wanted to take the time to celebrate you. You are love, in its purest, most genuine form. I have admired you as a mentor since I was 17-years-old. You have been a part of every major life...
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Dear Godmother Rosie,  I hope this letter finds you well and far away from the panic of Corona!  I was going to start this letter off with the most melodramatic line I could think of: I have failed you! Those words would have given the indication that the content of this letter was going to...
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