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In Her Words
During the summer of 2008, I visited Mississippi for the first time. It was my first time being away from home and also my first time staying on a historically black college campus. I was 15 years old when I heard about women in the civil rights movement, outside of Rosa Parks. Black women such as...
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Dear Natalie,   As we celebrate, organizationally, the Black women who inspire us to be our best selves, I wanted to take the time to celebrate you. You are love, in its purest, most genuine form. I have admired you as a mentor since I was 17-years-old. You have been a part of every major life...
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Dear Godmother Rosie,  I hope this letter finds you well and far away from the panic of Corona!  I was going to start this letter off with the most melodramatic line I could think of: I have failed you! Those words would have given the indication that the content of this letter was going to...
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her unknown majesty’s chambers are silent like a heart clothed in solitude // the queen Mereba, awakens from her slumber // her name means blessing // a balm to the lands //from this fantasy from this golden chalice a warrior’s lips drinks // her beloved spear rests in her lap as she stares into an...
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Big Cassie!  If heaven had a phone, an extra divine line wouldn’t even be able to handle my sky-high call volume.  Hearing your voice outside of my memories would bless my soul. So much so I think God would make an exception for me. After all, you’re proof that angels walk the earth among the...
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I don’t know when I first learned about Ida B. Wells. I wonder if, being a Mississippian, she has always existed in my consciousness or if there was a moment at which I was specifically educated about her. No matter, when I think about influences, inspiration and admiration, it is Ida B. Wells who, after...
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Someone once said, “The best things in life come when you least expect it.” For the longest, I heard that saying and was never able to truly apply it to my life, until I was accepted into the Reese|Brooks|Gilbert Collegiate Leadership Initiative at The Lighthouse | Black Girl Projects. In all honesty, I struggled to...
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In the mid-2000s, long after the AIDS pandemic hit the Western world during the 1980s, life in South Africa was upside down, and we were all sitting ducks, waiting for our parents, family members and neighbors to suddenly pass on. It was an eerie situation no one could save us from.  We felt helpless. South...
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