Our blog offers Black creatives a platform to discuss their experiences and those of southern black girls and young women (in particular but not exclusively) on The Lighthouse’s website. Through this project, creatives use writing, photography, videography and other mediums to underscore the organization’s mission, further elevating those voices on matters ranging from reproductive justice to music, economic justice to pop culture.

Even More Statues and Stupid

University of Mississippi leaders have been struggling over whether or not to keep a monument to vicious slavery and barbarity on school grounds. The university’s student senate, faculty senate, staff lawyers and high officials passed a measure last year to move one of their confederate monuments to a confederate graveyard where it could molder with...
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The World of Privilege Explored in Kiley Reid’s “Such a Fun Age”

Lots of people say being around toddlers is fun. They talk for hours, love to play and explore and like to think they’re big kids. However, the night Emira Tucker babysat 2-year-old Briar Chamberlain was no fun at all. Emira started her day like any other. She went to work and later attended a best...
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NY Public Library Lists Their Most Checked Out Books of All Time

Library books often take interesting journeys—people to people, place to place. Ever wonder wonder how many hands have touched the books we check out and how many stories the books have been a part of, aside from those that are held within their pages? This year, the New York Public Library turned 125 years old....
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Announcing The Life Story Grants

The Lighthouse | Black Girl Projects is excited to be among the recipients of The Life Story Grants, a three-year initiative funded by the NoVo Foundation to close the on ramps into the sex trade and open pathways to exit. With this funding, The Lighthouse will be able to deepen our commitment to supporting those...
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The Minority Legislator Lockout

Republican House Speaker Phillip Gunn is making a move to cut retired state employees, teachers and educators from legislative office. Up until the opening of the session, retired public employees were hopeful they could still draw their state pensions while serving in the Mississippi Legislature thanks to a rule adopted by the Public Employees Retirement...
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Week Two: Medicaid Expansion, Minority Legislator Lockout, Voter Registration Bills and Virginia Turns Blue

New legislative bills are continuing to tumble out of the pipes at the Mississippi legislature this week, and some of them will undoubtedly have a rough road on their way to passage, despite their benevolence. Rep. Jarvis Dortch (D-Raymond) said he is submitting a bill this month to extend maternal Medicaid coverage for new mothers...
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Make Your Next Career Move Your Best Move

A new year has arrived, and with it may come  a renewed desire to tackle goals and open yourself up to new opportunities for growth. Whether you’re looking to take your career to the next level or land your first post-college gig, knowing what you want is half the battle. Here’s a guide on how...
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Fiction Writer Rebekah Weatherspoon Wants to Give Black Women Their Happily Ever Afters

Every October, it seems love and relationships begin to underscore everything. The start of cuffing season begins and suddenly engagement ring commercials, complex flash mob proposals, and holiday themed romantic comedies increase exponentially during the months-long ramp up to Valentine’s Day. With all that, one might be hard pressed to find many works of fiction...
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2020 Session Begins with Religion, Rednecks and Rain

Bills, Bills, Bills It’s the first week of the Mississippi legislative session and racist bills are already barreling through Capitol halls. (How are we already at the lightning round?!) Two bills submitted by Republican Sen. Joseph Seymour, of Vancleave, make a fine example. Seymour thinks the recent national effort to push the casted images of...
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Rep. Pressley Attacks Zero-Tolerance School Policies Hurting Young Minorities

United States Rep. Ayanna Pressley, (D-Mass.), recently introduced a bill to slow the school-to-prison pipeline plaguing minority students, particularly in the South. Pressley’s PUSHOUT Act (Ending Punitive, Unfair, School-Based Harm that is Overt and Unresponsive to Trauma) follows a documentary released by filmmaker Dr. Monique W. Morris, PUSHOUT: The Criminalization of Black Girls in Schools,...
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Habitual Offender Laws Tearing Black Families Apart, Busting the Budget, Warns Group

When a kid stands before his mom after repeatedly defying her and acting out, mom tends to judge the child a little more harshly. It’s the same kind of “third-strike” behavior that applies to the court system. When a judge reviews a repeat offender, she may be tempted to evaluate the suspect more severely. And...
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White Conservative Governors Benefit When They Fail You

White Americans generally think U.S. democracy is tough and durable. Groups whose vote protection has only been legally enforced within the last 6 decades, however, know better. Observant politicos know that real democracy is a delicate thing that breaks like a glass hammer, if you don’t protect it. And all over the world, right now,...
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Leaving Home to Find Myself at College

I knew I was going to go to college before I was in high school. When I was a middle school student, I had the opportunity to visit multiple predominately white institutions (PWIs), and I knew then that, despite these universities seeming warm and inviting, I wouldn’t do well in that type of environment. So...
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Alone but Never Lonely

Per my Aunt Becky’s research, the following was true: There were no Black people in Salt Lake City, Utah. Therefore, she reasoned I had no business going there. Her theory ended with me being kidnapped, raped then killed. I rejected both her research and rationale, jumped on an airplane for the first time in my...
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The Beauty I Didn’t Expect to Find

Someone once said, “The best things in life come when you least expect it.” For the longest, I heard that saying and was never able to truly apply it to my life, until I was accepted into the Reese|Brooks|Gilbert Collegiate Leadership Initiative at The Lighthouse | Black Girl Projects. In all honesty, I struggled to...
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