By

Polly C. Speak
The news on COVID-19 keeps coming in, and it does not look good for many Southern states. Even low-population Mississippi logged more than 1,000 coronavirus infections in one day in late June, up from a daily average of about 400, which sent state officials into a panic. This bodes badly for Black Americans in these...
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After untold years of stalling, the Democratically-controlled House of Representatives has finally set a vote for the District of Columbia to have statehood. The move sets the stage for at least 320,000 African-Americans to have democratic representation. “Statehood is the only thing that will put the 700,000 residents of the district of Columbia on equal...
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Democracy was underway in the few states that held primaries this month. In one state, however, it nearly sputtered to a halt.   “We are deeply disturbed by widespread reports of malfunctioning machines, long lines, polling sites that opened late and insufficient numbers of back up paper ballots in Georgia,” said Kristen Clarke, president and executive director...
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Young students all over Mississippi and the South are celebrating their high school graduation under the shadow of COVID-19. Schools have taken to breaking up graduation ceremonies into multi-day events in order to keep participation low and reduce the risk of spreading the deadly disease. Clinton High School, for example, broke their celebration into 19...
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With overcrowded units, dated prison facilities, obscure cleaning methods and a shortage of COVID-19 tests, there is no reason to assume the virus isn’t running unchecked through Mississippi’s prisons, say attorneys. For this reason, a host of organizations are calling on the state to finally update two of its biggest prisons to reflect post-COVID threats....
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The U.S. Department of Education, under Education Secretary Betsy Devos, is rolling back Obama-era rules to the nationwide Title IX program that will make it even harder for women to report incidents of rape and sexual assault to campus supervisors. “Title IX” is a federal civil rights law passed as a component of several amendments in...
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Two years after barely defeating his Black Democratic opponent, Georgia Gov. Brian Kemp is opening his state for business amid a deadly pandemic. Atlanta residents, frankly, are not amused. “I can’t understand where this (eagerness) is coming from considering we’re unable to properly distance ourselves from our clients,” said Linda Sharp, owner of Lark &...
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While everybody was fretting over being locked away in their own house for a few more weeks, one Mississippi man is facing being locked away in state prison for 12 years for walking into a county pen with a cellphone. Mississippi resident Willie Nash didn’t know what hit him the day Circuit Court Judge Mark...
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When the Mississippi economy faltered due to the 2008 national recession, and again in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina in 2005, it was largely due to circumstances beyond the influence of the average Mississippian. When Americans and Mississippians voluntarily choose to shut down a whole economy, however, we do it with flair. Mississippi and the...
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A three-judge panel of the Fifth Circuit Court of Appeals did something nobody expected in this political climate: They took public education seriously. Last month, the judges bucked their court’s conservative nature and opened the door to a trial over school funding, which conservative U.S. District Judge William H. Barbour had wanted dead. Two years...
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