By

Natalie A. Collier
  It’s apropos (and disgusting) that Miss. Gov. Tate Reeves declared April Confederate Heritage Month. So many things happened in April besides whatever would compel someone to dedicate a month to people who lost a war. Here are a couple of things we could be commemorating this month:     In April 1968, Martin Luther King Jr....
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There’s an unspoken rule when Black folks die: other Black folks bring fried chicken, canned drinks, paper towels and other paper goods, anything that makes hosting a house of bereaved family easier. These practical gifts aren’t only about convenience; they’re about the camaraderie that comes with the visit, collective grieving. Community resumes post-funeral service at...
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I’ve always worked a lot. This year was no different. The pandemic required we shift the way we do most of our work at The Lighthouse and demanded we do some things we haven’t done before (like putting money aside specifically to give individual microgrants to people we work alongside who have been financially impacted...
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Goodie Mob, a group with whom I’ve consciously uncoupled because … reasons, sang at the end of the interlude “Free” in 1995, “But I won’t accept this is how it’s gone be / ’Cause I wanna be free, completely free / Lord won’t you please come and save me / I wanna be free totally...
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It seemed irresponsible not to say anything on our next staff call, but I didn’t know what to say, so I’d been vacillating. Then our senior staff reporter sent a text and asked if we—he wouldn’t write it, he noted—should have an editorial response to the most recent murders of Black folks. Here again, we probably should...
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If your life is anything like many of us who work at The Lighthouse, whenever your phone buzzes lately, it’s one of a few things: someone looking to start a conversation with “WYD?,” a question about work, (despite the fact you have some intra-office communication medium, like Microsoft Teams), or the “Do you have time...
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It doesn’t take any real level of scholarship to understand Mississippi has struggled with equity since it was granted statehood more than two centuries ago. That trend has continued with the state’s latest—and honestly feeble—attempt to address the disproportionate economic and social toll the COVID-19 pandemic is exacting on Black Mississippians, who represent nearly 40...
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Our office was abuzz Monday, February 17. You may have been at home, catching up on sleep, a little cleaning, watching “The Price is Right.” It was President’s Day, but the staff here worked. It’s a holiday I don’t value enough to not be productive. I would imagine, though, on March 20, you may be...
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Black Folks: Keep Your Head Up When I was in New Orleans last week, a small group of us Mississippians gathered to talk about the election, since lots of other people at the convening were also discussing it. I was reminded of how know precarious the voting situation is for Black folks in the state,...
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Note: Since the time of this writing, a Fort Worth Police officer (Aaron Dean, who resigned and was, subsequently, arrested and charged with murdered) killed another person, 27-year-old Atatiana Jefferson, in her home. I didn’t pay attention to most of the case like many people did, because I knew what would happen, and I had...
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