By

HIlary Word
I was 8- or 9-years-old the first time my family and I celebrated Kwanzaa. I vividly remember reading about the holiday in my elementary school’s library and asking my parents if we could start a tradition of celebrating it. I thought it so was interesting that a Black American had created a holiday that could...
Read More
Despite being a voracious reader, I admit I don’t often read poetry. This is partially due to feelings of slight intimidation. I have often found myself utterly befuddled attempting to read poetry, certain the meanings behind the poems have gone over my head. So I was worried I wouldn’t be able to enjoy sociologist and...
Read More
In 1942, writer Margaret Walker’s seminal work, “For My People,” earned her the Yale Series of Younger Poets Award. It would be 74 years until another Black person—the second also happened to be a woman—would win again. After much work, writing and rewriting poem after poem, Airea Dee Matthews’ received an acknowledgment in 2016 few...
Read More
My introduction to Mississippi author Jesmyn Ward’s novels was through her second novel, “Salvage the Bones.” This novel, which earned Ward a National Book Award for Fiction, made me fall in love with her storytelling. As such, I was very excited to read her latest novel, “Sing, Unburied Sing.” “Sing, Unburied, Sing” is set primarily...
Read More